Integral Education


#41

Congratulations on the baby!

I’m putting together a program for Integral Education. I’ve gotten the attention of Georgia’s D.O.E. and two universities. I think there is a lot of potential here, but I would love input on it. I started a post asking Corey about Integral Incubator, some place to move beyond theory but continue the same rigor of thought while creating more action.

Where I am at is the state is interested in me developing a work based learning program. We pitched the idea of doing this through programs that we called “mindful” and “socially conscious” business practices. The state’s response was basically, “If you can help me get businesses to engage in rural communities we don’t care how you do it”.

I have connected with Emory University and their Emory-Tibet program. They have just launched a beautiful program called SEE Learning. It is the most integral thing I have seen in the mainstream. They are directly working with frameworks through states and quadrants. It’s cool, it’s free and if nothing else everyone should check it out.

https://seelearning.emory.edu/

They are interested in me since the idea of getting this type of program woven into a work based learning feels innovative. As you can imagine, their program is being mostly received by more green-level schools. WBL is typically amber, so no one working in progressive education tends to look there. They intuitively get weaving these levels together feels like a powerful step forward.

To be clear, nothing is formalized yet. It’s all still in the coffee chat phase, but I think if I can pull it together it could go. One of my main obstacles is I am not an educator so I really don’t know what I am doing (one does need some orange expertise:)) Any input by experts would be greatly appreciated.


#42

Congrats! I hope you are getting some sleep. How is it going so far?
Sounds like a wonderful practice for these children. Great job!


#43

@Michelle Keep us up to date. I will check out this site later on.


#44

Eric recommendation seems like a good one. I’m still waiting for Susan Cook Greuter’s book that she said she was working on last year. Does anyone know anything about it? Corey?


#45

Is anyone familiar with Sudbury schools and the philosophy of self-directed academies?


#46

Have you read the Igniting Brilliance book yet?


#47

Hi Ixvthrs,

No I have not. I’d like to but I have four books on my desk I have yet to read. I just bought another one this morning titled “What You’ve Got Is What You Want - Even If It Hurts” by Adam E. Jukes. In his video, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-xvyyi5Xmmg&t=4s
he talks about Freud’s concept of the "compulsion to repeat** . I’ve read about this in passing many times before in my reading in psychology but no one has explained it to me in a way that I can understand until I saw Adam’s video. I’m very interested in this because I can see how it affects me directly. I’ve grown tired of reading book ABOUT growth, transformation, waking up and growing up but no one is talking about HOW to do it and get it the fuck over with. How many more books, seminars, and videos do we have to watch in order to have some tangible measure of realization? As I see it, Adam is addressing, in a very direct way, a very serious problem we are share that’s preventing us from growing up -hence waking up- but no one in the Integral community is talking about it with the attention it deserves. I suspect this is the reason why I don’t hear much from Susan Cook Greuter because she too will say things that integralist prefer to ignore.

I was watching some videos from Terry Patten. God bless the man but I have no fucking idea what he’s taking about. Ken Wilber said that proper translation gives proper transformation and Terry’s manner of translation leaves a lot to be desired with all his new age talk that loses my undivided attention. I have no doubt that Susan too would have some misgivings about Terry and other integralist who are too much in love with the IDEA of transformation. There seems to be a collective compulsion to repeat ideas and concepts, and endless talk about all manner of transformation only to become another unwitting means of spiritual bypassing. Maybe I’m mistaken, but there is too much talk about waking up and nothing about growing up and I believe the latter is more important. Adam knows nothing about growing up but he knows, in a very direct way, one of the main reasons WHY we are not doing it. The compulsion to repeat takes many forms and like a virus in the mind, it affects us far more than we realize. I’m hoping Susan’s new book will also address this issue at length.


#48

I think Wilber emphasizes the Growing Up piece in his new book the Religion of Tomorrow, quite well. If you haven’t checked it out it’s worth a look.


#49

I am, I have a few friends who have kids in Sudbury.


#50

What are there thoughts on it? They must like it, I am assuming.


#51

Like any specialized school program it works for kids the program fits but not for everyone. My friends seem happy with it, but there are pros and cons like everything.